Monday, April 27, 2009

Why Did These Guys Get Jail Time?

Something to consider in the ongoing Republican cheerleading for torture:

Not to diminish the crime here - although it's obvious to anybody that shitty environments yield shitty behaviour in all but the best of us - but why do the following individuals get the shaft and nobody else?

Should they be pardoned? Or should the people who instituted the environment and the behaviour be sharing cells with some of 'em? I haven't really seen much mention of the folks who are ALREADY IN PRISON over these policies and it would be useful for journalists to ask the torture apologists and the pardoners what the following people are an example of. Justice? Injustice? Getting caught too soon?

Text ripped off from Wikipedia:
Courts-martial, nonjudicial, and administrative punishment

Twelve soldiers have been convicted of various charges relating to the incidents, all including dereliction of duty—most receiving relatively minor sentences. Two soldiers have either been cleared of charges or have not been charged. No one has been convicted for murders of detainees.

  • Colonel Thomas Pappas was relieved of his command on May 13, 2005 after receiving nonjudicial punishment on May 9, 2005 for two instances of dereliction, including that of allowing dogs to be present during interrogations. He was fined $8000 under the provisions of Article 15 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (nonjudicial punishment). He also received a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand (GOMOR) which effectively ends his military career.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Steven L. Jordan became the highest ranking Army officer to have charges brought against him in connection with the Abu Ghraib abuse on April 29, 2006.[46] Prior to his trial, eight of twelve charges against him were dismissed, two of the most serious after Major General George Fay admitted that he did not read Jordan his rights before interviewing him in reference to the abuses that had taken place. On August 28, 2007, Jordan was acquitted of all charges related to prisoner mistreatment and received a reprimand for disobeying an order not to discuss a 2004 investigation into the allegations.[47]
  • Specialist Charles Graner was found guilty on January 14, 2005 of conspiracy to maltreat detainees, failing to protect detainees from abuse, cruelty, and maltreatment, as well as charges of assault, indecency, adultery, and obstruction of justice. On January 15, 2005, he was sentenced to ten years in federal prison.[48]
  • Corporal Joshua Lee Betts, of the 321st Military Intelligence Battalion, Detachment 9, pled innocent on October 20, 2004 to conspiracy, dereliction of duty, maltreatment of detainees, assault, and numerous violations of Geneva Convention, and human rights violation. Cpl. Joshua Lee Betts was later cleared of all charges.
  • Staff Sergeant Ivan Frederick pled guilty on October 20, 2004 to conspiracy, dereliction of duty, maltreatment of detainees, assault and committing an indecent act in exchange for other charges being dropped. His abuses included making three prisoners masturbate. He also punched one prisoner so hard in the chest that he needed resuscitation. He was sentenced to eight years in prison, forfeiture of pay, a dishonorable discharge and a reduction in rank to private.[49]
  • Sergeant Javal Davis pled guilty February 4, 2005 to dereliction of duty, making false official statements and battery. He was sentenced to six months in prison, a reduction in rank to private, and a bad conduct discharge.
  • Specialist Jeremy Sivits was sentenced on May 19, 2004 by a special court-martial to the maximum one-year sentence, in addition to being discharged for bad conduct and demoted, upon his plea of guilty.[50]
  • Specialist Armin Cruz of the 325th Military Intelligence Battalion was sentenced on September 11, 2004 to eight months confinement, reduction in rank to private and a bad conduct discharge in exchange for his testimony against other soldiers.[51]
  • Specialist Sabrina Harman was sentenced on May 17, 2005 to six months in prison and a bad conduct discharge after being convicted on six of the seven counts. She had faced a maximum sentence of 5 years.[52]
  • Specialist Megan Ambuhl was convicted on October 30, 2004, of dereliction of duty and sentenced to reduction in rank to private and loss of a half-month’s pay.[53]
  • Private First Class Lynndie England was convicted on September 26, 2005, of one count of conspiracy, four counts of maltreating detainees and one count of committing an indecent act. She was acquitted on a second conspiracy count. England had faced a maximum sentence of ten years. She was sentenced on September 27, 2005, to three years confinement, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, reduction to Private (E-1) and received a dishonorable discharge.[49]
  • Sergeant Santos Cardona was convicted of dereliction of duty and aggravated assault, the equivalent of a felony in the U.S. civilian justice system. He served 90 days of hard labor at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. He was transferred to a new unit and was promoted to Sergeant. He is currently assigned to the 23rd MP Company that is presently staged in Kuwait as of November 2006. He has arrived in Kuwait with his unit and has been selected to train Iraqi police.[54]
  • Specialist Roman Krol pled guilty on February 1, 2005 to conspiracy and maltreatment of detainees at Abu Ghraib. He was sentenced to ten months confinement, reduction in rank to private, and a bad conduct discharge.[55]
  • Specialist Israel Rivera, who was present during abuse on October 25, is under investigation but has not been charged and has testified against other soldiers.
  • Sergeant Michael Smith was found guilty on March 21, 2006 of two counts of prisoner maltreatment, one count of simple assault, one count of conspiracy to maltreat, one count of dereliction of duty and a final charge of an indecent act, and sentenced to 179 days in prison, a fine of $2,250, a demotion to private, and a bad conduct discharge.

17 comments:

Rusty Shackleford said...

None of them should get jail time because they kept us safe, duh

Righteous Bubba said...

I think at the time they were even more saintly: they were selflessly keeping Iraqis safe.

Rusty Shackleford said...

They were stacking naked people over there so we wouldn't have to stack them over here IN OUR OWN STREETS AND NEIGHBORHOODS

tigris said...

Oh great: NAKED STACKING NEIGHBORHOOD STREET PARTY CANCELED. Thanks for nothing, Rusty.

Captcha: staca, no lie.

Seriously, though, RB, that's a very good point that I haven't seen raised often enough.

Righteous Bubba said...

It cannot be denied that if you are one small part of a stack you are safer when your stacker sics the vicious dogs on you.

Another Kiwi said...

In wingnuttia all soldiers are saints, except for a few bad apples who, acting independently, do a few things they shouldn't do. Thus when the AG story was fully outed and the bad, independent, soldiers had been punished the sadder, but wiser, commanding officers could sigh and continue being saints.
Er.. don't you people have naked stacking neighbourhood parties? Jeepers, when do you organise the wife swapping?

Righteous Bubba said...

Only socialists swap wives for FREE.

Another Kiwi said...

There are rolls of copper wire and bottles of beer involved, I'll have you know!

Rusty Shackleford said...

In Soviet Union, wife swaps YOU!

Righteous Bubba said...

Swats?

J— said...

The Egyptians may have made the first pyramid, but it took AMERICAN ingenuity to perfect it.

J— said...

it would be useful for journalists to ask the torture apologists and the pardoners what the following people are an example of.

Giving legal advice that says torture is okay: not criminal. Giving orders to subordinates to carry out torture: not criminal, with a few local exceptions. Carrying out the orders: criminal.

t4toby said...

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!1!

Righteous Bubba said...

Bastard! I was blissfully ignorant!

J— said...

Tortious news to be sure, but I do appreciate the connection some of the Rolling Stone commenters make between the swine flu outbreak and Creed's reunion.

Righteous Bubba said...

Just made a "swine flew" rollover, which I thought was brilliant.

J— said...

Just made a "swine flew" rollover, which I thought was brilliant.

Ooh, that's good, although the Pink Floyd fans might not be pleased.